Skip to main content
  • 9-months special financing on orders $299+ when you use your ShopHQ Card††. Offer ends 1/31.  -    Learn more.
  • 12-months special financing on orders $499+ when you use your ShopHQ Card††. Offer ends 1/31.  -    Learn more.
  • 18-months special financing on orders $699+ when you use your ShopHQ Card††. Offer ends 1/31.  -    Learn more.

Instantly improve your work experience with DURABLE & LIGHTWEIGHT monitor stands and computer risers. Use with most flat screen display monitors or televisions, laptops, printers and more - they are stylish and neutral in design so they will coordinate with most furniture at work, within your home office or dorm room décor.

Details

  • Accessories/Packaging Includes: One Rotative Adjustable Monitor Riser with Drawer
  • Brand: Mind Reader
  • Assembly Required: No
  • Assembly Tools Included: No
  • Battery Included: No
  • Bulb Included: No
  • Care Instructions: Wipe Clean
  • Length: 13.75in.
  • Width: 15.75in.
  • Height: 23.5in.
  • Weight: 2.86lbs.
  • Indoor/Outdoor: Indoor Only
  • Material Content: Plastic
  • Wall Mountable : No
  • Country of Origin: Taiwan

Vendor Warranty Terms: No Warranty

Product Disclaimer

Furniture Styles

Queen Anne:
Made popular in the 19th century, the Queen Anne style of furniture is known to have a lighter and more feminine appearance. It is most commonly noted for its curving shapes, cabriole legs (a leg that has both an upper and lower curve) and cushioned seats. Padded feet (sometimes claw feet) are a signature feature on many Queen Anne pieces. Another feature to look for is carved scroll and shell motifs typically found on the crest and knees of chairs. Queen Anne furniture is crafted from a variety of woods with brass or wooden hardware.

Baroque:
Originating in Rome at the beginning of the 17th century, this style of furniture is characterized by dramatic effects, grand design and details to impress. Some pieces are similar to the Queen Anne style, with curvy lines and cabriole legs. However, the majority of pieces are over-the-top with features such as gold, marble, cherubs, angels and mirrors. Intricate design details also tend to cover the arms, legs and any other open spaces along the furniture.

Mission:
Mission style furniture is plain and simple in design. A strong emphasis is placed on vertical and horizontal lines. The pieces have no extra detail work and are known for their basic straight line construction. Most pieces are created in wood with a dark or medium stain. If the piece is for sitting, it is typically covered in leather material. Very basic iron, steel or copper is used as the hardware.

Chippendale:
Very similar to the Queen Anne style, these pieces are slightly more elaborate and are intricately carved with natural motifs like shells or acanthus leaves. Originally introduced in the 1700s, the Chippendale style can be classified into three types: French influence, Chinese influence and Gothic influence. Many Chippendale pieces have cabriole legs with padded claws, but with much more scroll work and fancy ornamentation. High quality mahogany wood and fine upholstered fabric are two key characteristics. Pieces for sitting are usually in horseshoe, square or trapezoid shapes and are upholstered in leather, silk, tapestry, velvet, needlepoint, hair cloth or brocade.

Sheraton:
Sheraton is a neoclassical style characterized by delicate straight lines, light construction, contrasting veneers and ornamentation. At one time it was the most reproduced style in the United States. In contrast to Chippendale or Queen Anne styles, Sheraton pieces usually have straight or tapered legs, sometimes joined with stretchers. Many pieces often have more than one type of wood (satin, beech and mahogany being the most popular). Common details on these pieces include drapery swags, lyres, ribbons, fans, feathers, urns and flowers. Lion heads, stamped plates, rosettes and urns are typically found on the hardware. The majority of Sheraton pieces are square or rectangular. Sofas are noted for a clean flow without a noticeable break and exposed arms.

Modern:
The elements of modern design include both curved and horizontal lines. Pieces such as shelves, tables and cases often have an appearance of "floating" with hidden support. Modern pieces are often asymmetrical, unembellished and are known to be longer and lower to the ground. Materials like molded plywood, plastic and metal are very common in modern furniture. The majority of modern pieces have slender legs that contribute to an open and airy atmosphere. You'll also find the furniture often has a bright pop of color to offset a bland room.

Contemporary:
Contemporary style pieces stick with the theme that less is more. You'll find asymmetrical shapes with straight and simple lines and no decoration or ornament detail. Sofas, chairs and ottomans have exposed legs. Beds and chairs usually have no skirt, trim, fringe or other enhancements. The furniture is typically designed in neutral colors. What is considered to be contemporary furniture is always changing and is truly of the moment.

Victorian:
Victorian style furniture draws its influence from Queen Victoria and generally contains elaborate detailing like carvings and applied ornaments. Constructed to be long lasting, the wood used is very heavy in nature (such as mahogany, burr walnut, rosewood or ebony). Buttoned upholstery is a key standard in armchairs and sofas. Cabriole legs are found on tables, beds, chairs, desks and cabinets. Dark finishes on all pieces help to create a formal appearance.

Rustic:
Rustic furniture pieces appear to have a "worn in" look. They don't have a lacquered shine or contain any plastic. Many of the pieces are scratched and nicked to enhance their appearance. Often times real parts of tree branches and trunks are used to create a functional piece of furniture. For example, bed posts, chair legs, tabletops and lamp legs can be created from thick branches or tree trunks. Elements of wood and nature are present throughout rustic pieces.

Scandinavian Contemporary:
Scandinavian contemporary pieces can be described as furniture that adds function. Concealed storage compartments, slide out tables and trundle beds are unique characteristics that set this style apart from others. You'll find that these pieces are made out of a variety of sturdy wood including ash, birch, black walnut, elm, hickory, mahogany, maple, oak and teak. They feature straight lines with a simple design and have very little ornamentation. The idea is function versus appearance. Hardware is typically made of wood and upholstery covers most seating pieces, chair arms and backs.

Hepplewhite:
Hepplewhite is a neoclassic style characterized by a delicate appearance, tapered legs, and the use of contrasting veneers and inlay. It is named after British designer and cabinetmaker George Hepplewhite whose designs in "The Cabinet Maker and Upholsterers Guide" were published posthumously in 1788. This style was reproduced in the United States particularly in the Carolinas, Maryland, New England, New York and Virginia.

AGP (Accelerated Graphics Port): A computer with an AGP will allow you to add a video card that will greatly increase the speed at which the computer can display graphics.

Bus: Refers to the path data travels on through a computer. Different computer models can have different bus speeds.

CD-R (Compact Disk Recordable): This is a CD that can be recorded or "burned" only once.

CD-ROM (Compact Disk Read Only Memory): A CD that stores information a computer can read but not alter. A CD can hold less information than a DVD but is also less expensive.

CD-RW (Compact Disk Re-Writable): This is a CD that can be recorded and re-recorded many times.

DVD-ROM (Digital Video Disk Read Only Memory): A DVD that stores information a computer can read but not alter. A DVD can hold more information than a CD.

DVD-RW (Digital Video Disk Re-Writable): This is a DVD that can store computer information that can be recorded and re-recorded many times. A DVD can hold more information than a CD.

Ethernet: A common method of connecting computers to a Local Area Network or LAN. Most computers today have ethernet capability.

Gigabyte (GB): This is a measurement of hard drive capacity. One gigabyte is equal to about one billion bytes.

Gigahertz (GHz): This is a measurement of processor speed. One gigahertz is equal to one billion hertz.

Hard drive: Also called a hard disk. This is where the computer permanently stores information, including the operating system and other software. This size of a hard drive is usually expressed in gigabytes (GB).

Hardware: The physical components of a computer system such as the keyboard, monitor and tower.

LCD (Liquid Crystal Display): This is a type of monitor that has a flat screen as opposed to a more traditional curved glass tube screen. LCD monitors are thin and lightweight and have little to no glare.

Megabyte (MB): This is a measurement of hard drive capacity. One megabyte is equal to about one million bytes.

Megahertz (MHz): This is a measurement of processor speed. One gigahertz is equal to one million hertz.

Memory: Also referred to as RAM, or Random Access Memory. This is where the computer temporarily holds the data it needs to perform various functions. The more RAM a computer has, the less often it has to read information off of a disk.

Modem (MOdulator/DEModulator): This is a device that allows a computer to connect to the Internet.

PCI (Peripheral Component Interconnect): A computer can have one or more PCI slots, which allow you add on extra components such as sound cards.

Processor: The computer's "brain." Processors are gauged by how fast they can access and interpret information, and this speed is measured in either megahertz (MHz) or gigahertz (GHz).

RAM (Random Access Memory): The amount of RAM in your computer determines how much data your computer can handle at once. If a computer only has a small amount of RAM, the processor must work harder to shuffle data around, which results in slower performance. There are two basic types of RAM:

SDRAM (Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory): This is the traditional, less expensive type of RAM. It is still commonly found on low and mid-range models.

DDR (Double Data Rate): This newer technology is faster than SDRAM, but also more expensive.

Resolution: The number of pixels per square inch displayed by a monitor. Most monitors support many different resolutions. The higher the resolution, the sharper the picture displayed.

Scanner: A device that can read text or images printed on paper (including photographs) and translate the information into an electronic computer file.

SCSI (Small Computer System Interface): Pronounced "scuzzy," this is a way for external components such as a keyboard, mouse and printer to connect to a computer. It has been largely replaced by USB technology.

Software: A general term for computer programs.

USB (Universal Serial Bus): This is a common way for external components such as a keyboard, mouse and printer to connect to a computer. Unlike older SCSI technology, USB devices can be added to and removed without having to reboot the computer.