Skip to main content

Embrace the ethereal elegance of these Toscana Italiana earrings! Designed to sway elegantly with your every move both drops feature faceted gemstone beads descending to an 18K yellow gold embraced charm featuring a symbol from the goddess of your choice. Butterfly backs ensure these enchanting earrings swing securely and apply with ease.

Earring Choice

  • Diana:
  • Two round full-drilled and faceted 6mm and two round full-drilled and faceted 8mm dyed black onyx beads
  • Fortuna:
  • Two round full-drilled and faceted 6mm and two round full-drilled and faceted 8mm dyed blue quartzite beads
  • Spes
  • Dyed Green Agate: Two round full-drilled and faceted 6mm beads
  • Dyed Green Aventurine: Two round full-drilled and faceted 8mm beads
  • Victoria
  • Pink Rhodolite: Two round full-drilled and faceted 6mm beads
  • Rose Quartz: Two round full-drilled and faceted 8mm beads
  • Venus
  • Pink Jasper: Two round full-drilled and faceted 6mm beads
  • Rose Quartz: Two round full-drilled and faceted 8mm beads

Earring Details

  • Metal: 18K yellow gold embraced™ bronze
  • Setting Type: Wire
  • Measurements: 2-5/8"L x 3/4"W x 5/16"H
  • Backing: Butterfly
  • Country of Origin: Italy

All weights pertaining to gemstones, including diamonds, are minimum weights. Additionally, please note that many gemstones are treated to enhance their beauty. View Gemstone Enhancements and Special Care Requirements for important information.

Onyx    Rhodolite    Jasper    Agate    GoldoverBronze    Drops    

Onyx
Onyx is a variety of chalcedony quartz that features a fine texture with a smooth black color. Some onyx can display white bands or ribbons against black or brown backgrounds. The bands that move through the stone run parallel and onyx is therefore sometimes known as zebra agate. Mined in Brazil, India, California and Uruguay, most onyx today is color-enhanced to increase its depth of color. It ranks a 6.5 on the Mohs Scale and is an ideal stone for carving. In fact, it is a favorite material of lapidary artists.

Onyx was very popular with the ancient Greeks and Romans. The name comes from the Greek word "onux" which means fingernail. Legend says that one day frisky Cupid cut the divine fingernails of Venus with an arrowhead while she was sleeping. He left the clippings scattered on the sand and the fates turned them into stone so that no part of her heavenly body would ever perish. In Greek times, almost all colors of chalcedony were called onyx. Later, the Romans narrowed the term to refer to only the black and dark brown colors, while the reddish brown and white onyx became known as sardonyx. Highly valued in Rome, sardonyx was especially used for seals because it was said to never stick to the wax. Roman General Publius Cornelius Scipio was famous for wearing sardonyx.

Worn during mourning in the Victorian age, onyx is now traditionally given as a 7th wedding anniversary gift. It is thought to increase happiness, self-control, courage, intuition and instincts. The stone is also believed to cool the yearnings of love and decrease sexual desire.

Rhodolite:
Often referred to as the “Queen of Garnets,” rhodolite is the violet-red variety of the garnet family. Its most prized color is a beautiful raspberry, but the gem can also be found in shades of pink, red and wine. The name is derived from the Greek words “rhodon” and “lithos,” meaning rose-stone, which connects the gemstone today with the raspberry-pink flower known as the rhododendron.

Rhodolite is a combination of almandine and pyrope garnets. Although it is occasionally found in volcanic rock, the stone is most often found in alluvial deposits in the form of water-worn pebbles. For this reason, large solitaires weighing 5.00ct or more are seldom seen at retail. Most rhodolite is mined in Sri Lanka, Tanzania and Zimbabwe. It ranks a 7.5 on the Mohs Scale and is ideal for jewelry.

The ancients wore rhodolites as amulets for protection from injury or death in battles. Modern folklore says rhodolite can help one understand dreams, as well as bring about love and devotion when given as a gift.

Jasper
Jasper is an opaque variety of chalcedony that contains organic materials and mineral oxides. These give it interesting patterns and colorful bands of red, brown, pink, yellow, green, gray, white and blue. Because these color designs resemble landscapes with mountains and valleys, jasper is often named according to its pattern , including the words “picture,” “landscape” or “ribbon” within the name. Picture jasper, for instance, is a petrified or silicated mud that dripped into gas pockets in molten lava. It became super-heated and then solidified to form the unusual banded patterns that are typical of this stone. Today, jasper is found worldwide, with a wide variety located in the western areas of the Unites States. The beautiful stone even adorns the Saint Wenceslas Chapel in Prague.

Jasper was a favorite gem in the ancient world and is referenced in Greek, Hebrew, Assyrian and Latin literature. It was b elieved to bring on rain and protect in dangerous situations by driving away evil spirits. Nowadays, jasper is thought to balance yin yang energies by stabilizing and healing. Poppy jasper is said to help bring joy into life and opalite jasper is said to help one sleep.

Agate
Found all over the world, agate has been creatively striped by nature. It is a type of chalcedony quartz that forms in concentric layers of colors and textures. Each individual agate forms by filling a cavity in a host rock. As a result, agate often is found as a round nodule with concentric bands like the rings of a tree trunk. Tiny quartz crystals called drusy (sometimes spelled as druzy) often form within the stone, adding to its beauty and uniqueness. Agate is a hard stone, within the range of 7.0-9.0 on the Mohs Scale.

In 1497, the mining of agate in the Nahe River valley in Germany gave rise to the cutting center of Idar-Oberstein. When the Nahe agate deposit was exhausted in the nineteenth century, Idar cutters started to develop the agate deposits of Brazil, discovering Brazil's rich deposits of many other gemstones. A famous collection of two to four thousand agate bowls, accumulated by Mithradates, King of Pontus, shows the popularity of agate at the time. Agate bowls were also popular in the Byzantine Empire. Collecting agate bowls became common among European royalty during the Renaissance and many museums in Europe, including the Louvre, have spectacular examples.

Although the small town of Idar-Oberstein is still known for the finest agate carving in the world, today Idar imports a huge range of other gem materials from around the world for cutting and carving in Germany. Cameo master carvers, modern lapidary artists and rough dealers flourish there, exporting their latest gem creations. It is an entire industry that grew from the desire for agate products during the Renaissance.

Agate was highly valued as a talisman or amulet in ancient times. It was said to quench thirst and protect from fevers. Persian magicians used agate to divert storms. Today, some believe that agate is a powerful emotional healer and helps people discern the truth.

Vermeil Plating:
Pronounced "vermay," vermeil is an electroplating process in which 14K gold or higher is coated over sterling silver. Officially designated by the jewelry industry, items may only be sold as vermeil if they have a minimum thickness of 100 millionths of an inch (2.5 microns) of gold over the silver. Regular gold plating is less than 2.5 microns.

The "vermeil" technique of plating sterling silver with gold originated in France in the 1750s. It differs from "gold filled" or "gold plated" in terms of the thickness or thinness of the microns over sterling silver. "Gold filled" pieces have a much thicker layer, between 15 and 45 microns, which is mechanically bonded to the base metal with heat and pressure. Vermeil is a more expensive version of "gold plated". It does not wear off as quickly as gold plating does. However, over time, vermeil wears off and therefore will require re-plating.

Gold/Platinum Embraced Silver or Bronze:
Our platinum and gold embraced collections feature layers of platinum or gold over sterling silver or bronze for a lustrous, radiant finish everywhere you look and touch.

To care for your plated jewelry items:

  • Remove jewelry before bathing, swimming, washing hands, putting on make-up, lotions, perfumes, and/or working with household chemicals, cleaners, or acidic liquids.
  • Do not clean plated jewelry in an ultrasonic cleaner or in silver cleaning solutions, as it could completely remove the plating finish from your item.
  • Ensure your jewelry item is thoroughly dry before storing. Moisture in an enclosed space can increase tarnishing.
  • Store your plated jewelry in a jewelry box lined with felt or anti-tarnish material. Items should not be stacked as this may cause damage to the plating surface.
  • Do not use excessive pressure when cleaning with a polishing cloth or soft brush, as this may cause damage to the plating.
  • Over time your plated items will need to be re-plated. Contact your local jeweler for information on plating services.

    Earring Back Types


    The backing is an important part of an earring, providing a secure closure and comfortable fit. Keep in mind, some earring styles work better with certain back types. Experiment with the different types to find the best fit for you!

    Butterfly Back: A double looped piece resembling a butterfly that fits over a post. Variations on this design are called push back clasps. The basic post and butterfly back are usually used for stud earrings and lighter weight drop earrings.

    Hinged Snap Backs: This clasp features a hinged post that snaps into a groove on the back of the earring. It is commonly found on hoops. Sometimes the hinged post is curved to provide more room to fit around the ear, sometimes called a saddleback.

    Hook Backs: This earring backing is simply a long, bent post that fits through the piercing. Hooks have several variations, most notably the shepherd's hook and the French hook. While thin wire hooks reduce the weight of long earrings, making them more comfortable, they aren't as secure as other clasp styles.

    Lever Back: A hinged lever snaps shut against the curved post to form a closed loop around the ear lobe. This clasp is very secure and good for large or medium sized styles that drop just below the ear.

    Omega: Also called French clips, this clasp has a straight post and a looped lever. The hinged lever closes around the post and is held against the ear with pressure. The omega clasp is the most secure clasp, especially for the larger, heavier earrings.

    Screw back: This backing is a slight variation of the standard post and butterfly nut back. Instead of pushing on the back, the nut twists onto the threaded post. A screw back post design is often preferred for expensive diamond stud earrings that require increased security.

  • About the Collection
    Transport yourself to historic Tuscany with Toscana Italiana jewelry. This collection combines the beauty of Italian craftsmanship with traditional style. Set in platinum or 18K gold over bronze, each piece tells its own story with intricate metalwork and genuine gemstones at an affordable price. From beautiful hammered finishes to filigree detailed silhouettes, Toscana Italiana highlights boldness, mystery, passion and heritage in an assortment that's only available at ShopHQ.

    Toscana Italiana
    Speak with an Italian accent

    Albany IrvinAbout the Guest
    Albany Irvin is a familiar face in the digital commerce world with years of experience selling products on-camera. She has a passion for bringing high style to everyone at an affordable price and specializes in bringing trend-right looks to the modern woman. Inspired by her travels to Italy and years of promoting Italian-made jewelry, Albany truly appreciates Italian craftsmanship and loves to share her experience with her viewers.

    ;