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Welcome your guests in style with this must-have, chrome luggage rack. The same contemporary design that's found in high-end hotels and resorts can now be yours. Guests will appreciate easy access to their belongings as their luggage is held off the floor and within reach. Reinforced polyvinyl webbing is strong and durable to complement the heavy duty steel frame that easily holds up to 100 lbs. When not in use, the luggage rack folds flat and stows away easily under a bed or in the closet.

Details

  • Brand: Honey-Can-Do
  • Assembly Required: No
  • Assembly Tools Included: No
  • Length: 26.38in.
  • Height: 21.26in.
  • Weight: 4lbs.
  • Indoor/Outdoor: Indoor Only
  • Material Content: Steel
  • Care Instructions: Wipe clean with damp cloth
  • Country of Origin: Taiwan

Vendor Warranty Terms: 60-Day Warranty | scsegura@honeycando.com

Product Disclaimer

Furniture Styles

Queen Anne:
Made popular in the 19th century, the Queen Anne style of furniture is known to have a lighter and more feminine appearance. It is most commonly noted for its curving shapes, cabriole legs (a leg that has both an upper and lower curve) and cushioned seats. Padded feet (sometimes claw feet) are a signature feature on many Queen Anne pieces. Another feature to look for is carved scroll and shell motifs typically found on the crest and knees of chairs. Queen Anne furniture is crafted from a variety of woods with brass or wooden hardware.

Baroque:
Originating in Rome at the beginning of the 17th century, this style of furniture is characterized by dramatic effects, grand design and details to impress. Some pieces are similar to the Queen Anne style, with curvy lines and cabriole legs. However, the majority of pieces are over-the-top with features such as gold, marble, cherubs, angels and mirrors. Intricate design details also tend to cover the arms, legs and any other open spaces along the furniture.

Mission:
Mission style furniture is plain and simple in design. A strong emphasis is placed on vertical and horizontal lines. The pieces have no extra detail work and are known for their basic straight line construction. Most pieces are created in wood with a dark or medium stain. If the piece is for sitting, it is typically covered in leather material. Very basic iron, steel or copper is used as the hardware.

Chippendale:
Very similar to the Queen Anne style, these pieces are slightly more elaborate and are intricately carved with natural motifs like shells or acanthus leaves. Originally introduced in the 1700s, the Chippendale style can be classified into three types: French influence, Chinese influence and Gothic influence. Many Chippendale pieces have cabriole legs with padded claws, but with much more scroll work and fancy ornamentation. High quality mahogany wood and fine upholstered fabric are two key characteristics. Pieces for sitting are usually in horseshoe, square or trapezoid shapes and are upholstered in leather, silk, tapestry, velvet, needlepoint, hair cloth or brocade.

Sheraton:
Sheraton is a neoclassical style characterized by delicate straight lines, light construction, contrasting veneers and ornamentation. At one time it was the most reproduced style in the United States. In contrast to Chippendale or Queen Anne styles, Sheraton pieces usually have straight or tapered legs, sometimes joined with stretchers. Many pieces often have more than one type of wood (satin, beech and mahogany being the most popular). Common details on these pieces include drapery swags, lyres, ribbons, fans, feathers, urns and flowers. Lion heads, stamped plates, rosettes and urns are typically found on the hardware. The majority of Sheraton pieces are square or rectangular. Sofas are noted for a clean flow without a noticeable break and exposed arms.

Modern:
The elements of modern design include both curved and horizontal lines. Pieces such as shelves, tables and cases often have an appearance of "floating" with hidden support. Modern pieces are often asymmetrical, unembellished and are known to be longer and lower to the ground. Materials like molded plywood, plastic and metal are very common in modern furniture. The majority of modern pieces have slender legs that contribute to an open and airy atmosphere. You'll also find the furniture often has a bright pop of color to offset a bland room.

Contemporary:
Contemporary style pieces stick with the theme that less is more. You'll find asymmetrical shapes with straight and simple lines and no decoration or ornament detail. Sofas, chairs and ottomans have exposed legs. Beds and chairs usually have no skirt, trim, fringe or other enhancements. The furniture is typically designed in neutral colors. What is considered to be contemporary furniture is always changing and is truly of the moment.

Victorian:
Victorian style furniture draws its influence from Queen Victoria and generally contains elaborate detailing like carvings and applied ornaments. Constructed to be long lasting, the wood used is very heavy in nature (such as mahogany, burr walnut, rosewood or ebony). Buttoned upholstery is a key standard in armchairs and sofas. Cabriole legs are found on tables, beds, chairs, desks and cabinets. Dark finishes on all pieces help to create a formal appearance.

Rustic:
Rustic furniture pieces appear to have a "worn in" look. They don't have a lacquered shine or contain any plastic. Many of the pieces are scratched and nicked to enhance their appearance. Often times real parts of tree branches and trunks are used to create a functional piece of furniture. For example, bed posts, chair legs, tabletops and lamp legs can be created from thick branches or tree trunks. Elements of wood and nature are present throughout rustic pieces.

Scandinavian Contemporary:
Scandinavian contemporary pieces can be described as furniture that adds function. Concealed storage compartments, slide out tables and trundle beds are unique characteristics that set this style apart from others. You'll find that these pieces are made out of a variety of sturdy wood including ash, birch, black walnut, elm, hickory, mahogany, maple, oak and teak. They feature straight lines with a simple design and have very little ornamentation. The idea is function versus appearance. Hardware is typically made of wood and upholstery covers most seating pieces, chair arms and backs.

Hepplewhite:
Hepplewhite is a neoclassic style characterized by a delicate appearance, tapered legs, and the use of contrasting veneers and inlay. It is named after British designer and cabinetmaker George Hepplewhite whose designs in "The Cabinet Maker and Upholsterers Guide" were published posthumously in 1788. This style was reproduced in the United States particularly in the Carolinas, Maryland, New England, New York and Virginia.Luggage Tips & Baggage Allowances

Having the correct luggage and understanding the general TSA traveling requirements can make or break your trip. Check out below for some tips and requirements that will help you decide the appropriate luggage for your travels:

Frame & Construction
Luggage frames are most commonly made of aluminum, wood and/or durable molded plastic compounds. You want a lightweight inner frame that will ensure strength. When it comes to zippers, look for ones that are reinforced with taped seams to help prevent fraying. Also, double stitching ensures a smooth closure every time. A common misconception is that thick leather is the only material that prevents belongings from getting ruined during travel. However, this can make the suitcase very heavy and hard to move. Nylon is a nice alternative, as it costs less to manufacture and is sturdy enough to effectively protect your possessions.

Handles
Most wheeled suitcases contain a telescopic pull handle, allowing you to adjust the height and conceal the handle when not in use. The handle should be sturdy and able to withstand pulling. Finding a suitcase with a locking handle will help keep it from bending due to weight pressure. Non-wheeled bags will most likely have hand and shoulder straps. Take note of the overall construction, as handles are typically connected with screws or rivets. Screws are much easier to replace if broken. You’ll also want to be comfortable with the bag, so make sure its handle has a soft/padded, sturdy grip.

Rolling Luggage
If you don't want to carry your baggage, then rolling luggage is right for you. A common type is known as "spinner" luggage, which has four wheels instead of two. Having four wheels makes your suitcase more stable and easier to move through crowded areas. When looking for spinner luggage, wheels should be placed far apart and should attach deep into the bag's frame.

Tips:

  • Keep in mind how often you travel and what type of traveling you do. If you are a weekly business traveler, it makes sense to invest in higher-end luggage versus someone who is an occasional vacation traveler.
  • When looking for luggage, try to find pieces that aren’t too heavy. Keep in mind your luggage will become heavier once you start packing.
  • Consider getting a color other than black. Black is the most common luggage color and is often hard to spot when claiming your bag. If you do end up with black, add a distinctive color ribbon or line of paint on the handle so your bag is easier to find.
  • Even if your luggage has wheels, still make sure that you are able to lift and transport your bag. Not only could over-packing damage your bag, but it could possibly result in extra handling charges.
  • Make sure your luggage contains updated contact information (name, address, phone, e-mail) so if it gets lost, the airlines can easily get a hold of you.

    TSA Allowances for Carry-on Baggage:

  • One purse, briefcase, camera bag, diaper bag or laptop computer that can fit under the seat in front of you
  • One bag that measures 22" x 14" x 9" or smaller; May not exceed 45 linear inches in combined length, width and height
    Please note TSA requirements are subject to change and should be verified upon arriving at the airport.