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When you need a simple accessory to spice up your wardrobe, you'll love having this EFFY men's bracelet in your collection. The sterling silver bracelet is gold embraced with a braided design, making it versatile for any occasion.

Bracelet Details

  • Metal: 18K gold
  • Measurements: 10"L x 7/16"W x 1/16"H
  • Clasp: Hinged
  • Country of Origin: Thailand

Warranty

  • Limited manufacturer's warranty provided by EFFY. Please contact 1-800-275-3339.
Bracelets    Gold    SterlingSilver    18KGold    
Bracelet Clasp Types
A clasp is more than a practical device used to fasten your jewelry. It is part of the overall design and can be a very important focal point. Be sure to consider if it will suit your needs of durability, fashion, comfort and peace of mind.

Barrel Clasp: Used on most rope chains to make the chain more secure. The barrel clasp looks like part of the chain and twists to get a pendant on and off.

Lobster Claw Clasp: As a traditional clasp style found in bracelets and necklaces, the lobster claw is generally reserved for heavier styles that may need added strength. The closure's shape is more oblong, similar to a teardrop shape, and is controlled by a tip that opens and closes the spring in the clasp. This type is also considered a more expensive finding that can add to the overall value of the jewelry piece.

Magnetic Clasp: The popularity of the magnetic clasp has greatly increased in recent years. It is a quick and easy way to secure jewelry while not having to fuss with a tiny clasp, which can be difficult if you have long fingernails, arthritic hands or other mobility challenges. A magnetic clasp relies on a strong internal magnet that works to pull both ends of the clasp together. In most cases, a magnetic clasp is used for light to medium weight jewelry pieces that do not put excessive stress on the magnet.

S-Clasp: An S-shaped piece of metal that connects a chain by hooking metal rings on each end of the S-shape.

Slide Insert Clasp: This type of clasp is exactly as it sounds. With a box-like shape that is hollow on the inside, the wearer will slide the nearly-flat tab into the box until it clicks, indicating a secure closure. On some jewelry, a slide insert clasp will be accompanied by a side safety catch, which adds strength and security to the clasp. Although this type of clasp is found on both bracelets and necklaces, it is particularly popular on bracelet styles. These types of clasps are often reserved for more expensive jewelry.

Spring Ring Clasp: One of the most common closure types, the spring ring clasp is typically used for light to medium weight bracelets or necklaces. It is round in its design and features a small tip which controls the opening and closing of the spring. The circle then closes around another smaller loop or link at the other end of the strand.

Toggle Clasp: A toggle clasp is a narrow piece of metal, usually designed in the shape of a bar, which is then pushed through a circular ring to act as a fastener. Unlike the lobster claw or spring ring clasps, a toggle clasp is not controlled by a spring. The pretty design is less secure than other closure types, but is usually meant to be a big part of the design and is meant to "show". The clasp is an attractive way to secure a chunkier link bracelet or necklace.

Bracelet Sizing
To measure for a bracelet, wrap a soft, flexible tape measure around your wrist bone. Then, add 3/4" to 1" to that measurement to determine your bracelet size. Generally, 7" is considered a standard women's size and 8" is considered a standard men's size.

Another way to get an ideal fit is to measure the length of a bracelet you own. For bracelets that are to be slipped over the hand, measure the widest part of your hand to ensure the bracelet will fit over it.

Keep in mind that different bracelet styles tend to fit differently depending upon the clasp and materials used. Bracelets with adjustable clasps are usually one size fits all. Those with large beads or stones have less room for your wrist. Also, bracelets with links can usually be shortened by removing one or more links.

Each year, 75% of the world's mined gold is used to make jewelry. Gold is a symbol of enduring love and heritage, making it the coveted choice for jewelry that will be passed from generation to generation. As well, it has earned its place as the traditional gift for 50th wedding anniversaries.

The unrivaled permanence and emotion attached to gold result from many factors. The most obvious is that gold is aesthetically pleasing. The warm golden color is much loved, as are alloys that can be used to create a rainbow of different shades of the metal. Gold is extremely rare, requiring several tons of ore to produce just one ounce of gold. In fact, estimates are that all the gold ever mined could fit beneath the Eiffel Tower in Paris!

Gold's durability gives it an incredibly long-lasting value. Ancient gold jewelry, coins and artifacts on display in museums worldwide are testament to gold's enduring beauty. Additionally, gold is a heavy metal. In fact, one cubic foot weighs half a ton! When alloyed with other metals, the relatively soft metal becomes exceptionally strong, durable and indestructible. As well, gold is a pure substance resistant to the effects of air, heat and moisture. Thus, it resists tarnish and remains pleasing to the eye for lifetimes and beyond.

In spite of gold's strength and heaviness, it is very malleable, making it easy enough to work with that just one ounce can be worked into a continuous strand approximately 60 miles long. As well, it can be melted or shaped into an infinite number of designs, making it quite versatile for creative and beautiful jewelry designs.

History & Significance
Gold has been romanticized in popular culture for eras, used as currency and treasure in great civilizations, and even ascribed miraculous powers. Gold's long and winding history has traversed the world many times over. The Etruscans crafted objects by hand with threads of gold. Ancient Egyptians reserved gold's use for pharaohs only, equating it with the sun. The Incas called gold "the sweat of the sun" and the Chinese thought of gold as the sun's yang.

Chinese and Indian culture today remains that brides wear 24K gold on their wedding day for a lifetime of luck and happiness. Furthermore, in some cultures people eat gold to treat ailments that include arthritis, tuberculosis and ulcers.

In addition to gold's historical value, the tangible lasting value of gold has been established by its use as currency. Gold has been used for more than 5,000 years as currency. It holds its value and boasts a sense of permanency that paper currency does not. People tend to buy it in large quantities during times of crisis.

Beyond even the historical and monetary value of gold, the rare precious metal is an alluring aesthetic material with which some of this world's finest and most prized jewelry is crafted.

Finishes on Gold Jewelry
Gold jewelry is often "finished." This refers to surface treatments for gold jewelry, creating patterns and designs. Different types of finishes are often used in tandem to create contrasting effects.

Brushed: A satiny finish produced by a stiff metal brush applied in linear or circular patterns.

Diamond Cut: Tiny angled cuts into the surface create a bright faceted look.

Diamond Laser: Hammering the surface with a faceted, diamond-tipped tool creates a highly reflective finish.

Embossed: A relief pattern shaped in sheet metal.

Enameled: Colored glass fused onto a metal surface.

Engraved: A design cut with a sharp tool.

Etched: Chemical or hand-created designs or patterns cut into the surface to make a textured finish.

Filigree: Delicate patterns created by twisting together fine wires and flattening and bending them into intricate designs; these patterns are surrounded by a sturdy gold framework.

Florentine: Parallel lines are engraved in one direction with lighter perpendicular cross-hatchings or curved strokes; these lines are deeper than on brushed or satin finishes.

Granulated: Small and round gold particles hand-placed on a gold surface, then fastened by heating.

Hammered: Varied light to deep hammering applied directly to the surface to create a design.

High Polish: Bright and shiny, highly reflective finish.

Matte: Velvety finish lacking shine but boasting a soft luster.

Satin Finish: Soft and lustrous appearance resulting from light parallel lines that sharply reduce the metal's reflections.

Sterling Silver

Sterling silver, also called fine silver, is a beautifully lustrous cool-toned precious metal favored in fine jewelry among other products. The most reflective of all metals (excluding mercury), sterling silver looks stunning by itself and brings out the best hues in an array of colorful gemstones.

Sterling silver can be polished to a higher sheen than platinum. In fact, Ag, the chemical symbol for silver, comes from a word that means “white and shining.” The surface of silver can boast that shiny, polished appearance, or can be brushed, satin, matte, sandblasted, antiqued or oxidized (chemically blackened).

In order to be called sterling silver, a metal must be made up of a minimum of 92.5% pure silver and 7.5% alloy (meaning other metals), including but not limited to copper and nickel. The alloy is added to pure silver to make the metal more durable, tougher and harder. Sterling silver is designated a fineness of “925.” Pieces with sterling silver may be marked “sterling.”

Finishes on Sterling Silver
Finishing, or plating, is a common treatment with sterling silver. Popular types of plating are rhodium plating, gold plating and anti-tarnish plating. Plating is used to extend the life and sheen of the jewelry. After sizing or buffing a piece of jewelry with a machine, it must be re-plated to restore the finish.

  • Rhodium Plating: Rhodium plating is a complex and laborious process that enhances the luster and beauty and extends the life of silver. A member of the platinum metal group, rhodium is often used as a finishing touch on silver jewelry. It's a shiny silvery metal with a very white and reflective appearance, much like mercury. It's also very hard, so it withstands much wear and tear, resists natural tarnishing and wonderfully mimics the brilliant finish of freshly polished silver.

    Caring for Sterling Silver
    Sterling silver becomes tarnished as the result of a natural chemical process that occurs when sterling silver is exposed to chemicals in the air, rubber, wool and latex. Humidity also plays a role in accelerating tarnishing. It's easy to keep your sterling silver sparkling, though, by taking a few steps to prevent tarnish and other wear and tear.

  • Avoid exposing sterling silver to direct sunlight and harsh chemicals, including chlorine, ammonia, hair products, perfumes, cosmetics, perspiration and strong jewelry cleaning solutions.
  • Periodically wash sterling silver with mild dish soap and warm water. Rinse well and dry completely with a soft cloth before storing because moisture can cause tarnish.
  • Lightly polish sterling silver frequently with a soft silver-polishing cloth, avoiding abrasive cloths completely.
  • Tarnish is easy to remove when it first forms as a yellowish tint, but becomes more difficult to remove when it becomes brown and black. Remove tarnish with a silver polish cream, avoiding immersing pieces with gemstones in tarnish-removal solutions.
  • Minimize scratches on sterling silver by storing it in its own compartment in your jewelry box or in a cloth pouch. Sterling silver may also be stored in sealed polyethylene bags.

    Gold Karat
    Gold's softness and malleability make it a wonderful metal to work with when creating virtually any design in jewelry. But this softness can be a drawback as well. To make it stronger and more durable, gold is usually alloyed, or mixed, with other metals such as copper or silver. The higher a metal's percentage of gold content, the softer and more yellow the jewelry piece. The karat weight system used to measure gold in a piece is the same for all hues, including white and yellow gold.

    The word “carat” is Arabic, meaning “bean seed.” This is because historically seeds were used to measure weights of gold and precious stones. In the United States, “karat” with a “k” is used to measure gold's purity, while “carat” with a “c” is used in measuring a gemstone's size. The karat mark of gold represents the percentage of pure gold to alloy.

  • 24K is pure gold or 100% gold
  • 21K is 21/24ths gold content or 87.5% gold: In the United States, jewelry with this karatage or higher is rare. It is far more common in Europe, the Middle East and Southeast Asia.
  • 18K is 18/24ths gold content or 75% gold: This karatage is a popular high-end choice in the United States, Europe and other regions. Its popularity is spreading throughout North America.
  • 14K is 14/24ths gold content or 58.5% gold: This is the most common gold karatage in the United States because of its fine balance between gold content, durability and affordability.
  • 10K is 10/24ths gold content or 41.7% gold: This karatage is gaining popularity for its affordability and durability. Commonly used in everyday-wear jewelry such as rings, 10K gold beautifully withstands wear and tear. It is the lowest gold content that can be legally marked or sold as gold jewelry in the United States.

    In order to determine the karat weight of a specific item, simply look for the quality mark. Jewelry items will bear the stamp of their karatage based upon the United States or European system of marking. The United States system designates pieces by their karats—24K, 18K, 14K, 10K, etc. The European system designates pieces by their percentage of gold content. For instance, 10K gold is marked “417,” denoting 41.7% gold; 14K is marked “585,” denoting 58.5% gold; and 18K is marked “750,” denoting 75% gold; etc.

  • About the Collection
    Experience the luxury and exceptional beauty of the EFFY Jewelry Collection, a premier designer line featuring some of the finest diamonds and colored gemstones available. The EFFY Jewelry Collection includes elegant necklaces, bracelets, rings, earrings and pendants with gemstones set in 14K gold and silver.

    Classic EFFY styles add elegance to your everyday look, while contemporary pieces add a vibrant splash of color and sparkle. With luxurious styles varying from traditional and timeless to today's high fashion looks, there is a piece for you in the EFFY Jewelry Collection.

    About Founder & Designer Effy Hematian
    EFFY began more than 30 years ago as a family business with the mission of creating exquisite jewelry with the utmost attention to detail. Today, this luxury brand is sought out by those with impeccable standards and taste.

    Effy Hematian has built this luxury brand upon a foundation of quality, trust and integrity. Discover why the award-winning EFFY collection is one of the most well-regarded, premier jewelry collections in the world.

    Christopher ChurchAbout the Guest
    With over 27 years in the jewelry industry as a designer and stylist, Christopher Church brings his in-depth knowledge of manufacturing and visual arts to ShopHQ. His hands-on experience allows him to personally connect his jewelry to clients. As the ambassador to EFFY jewelry, he travels the country to various trunk shows, informing customers of quality, stone settings and jewelry craftsmanship. He and his wife have been married for 16 years, and have three children.

    Sunday, November 17