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Attract second glances and invite conversation when you hang this Stefano Oro Mexican peso pendant from your favorite chain. Minted from 22K gold, this genuine 50 peso coin features the Mexican coat of arms on one side and the Angel of Independence design on the other. Encircled in a 14K gold frame, it's sure to enrich any ensemble. 

Pendant Details

  • Metal:
  • Coin: 22K yellow gold
  • Coin Frame: 14K yellow gold
  • Approximate Total Weight: 45 grams
  • Measurements: 1-15/16"L x 1-9/16"W x 1/8"H
  • Collection: Stefano Oro
  • Country of Origin: Italy
YellowGold    14KGold    21to24KGold    StefanoOro    CoinJewelry    

Yellow Gold
By far the most common color of gold used in jewelry, yellow gold is gold in its natural shade. Yellow gold is usually alloyed with copper and silver to increase the strength of the metal. How yellow the metal is depends upon the content of gold. A 14-karat piece of jewelry will have a brighter yellow hue than a 10-karat piece. Likewise, an 18-karat piece of jewelry will have a deeper yellow than 14-karat gold, and so on.

Gold Karat
Gold's softness and malleability make it a wonderful metal to work with when creating virtually any design in jewelry. But this softness can be a drawback as well. To make it stronger and more durable, gold is usually alloyed, or mixed, with other metals such as copper or silver. The higher a metal's percentage of gold content, the softer and more yellow the jewelry piece. The karat weight system used to measure gold in a piece is the same for all hues, including white and yellow gold.

The word “carat” is Arabic, meaning “bean seed.” This is because historically seeds were used to measure weights of gold and precious stones. In the United States, “karat” with a “k” is used to measure gold's purity, while “carat” with a “c” is used in measuring a gemstone's size. The karat mark of gold represents the percentage of pure gold to alloy.

  • 24K is pure gold or 100% gold
  • 21K is 21/24ths gold content or 87.5% gold: In the United States, jewelry with this karatage or higher is rare. It is far more common in Europe, the Middle East and Southeast Asia.
  • 18K is 18/24ths gold content or 75% gold: This karatage is a popular high-end choice in the United States, Europe and other regions. Its popularity is spreading throughout North America.
  • 14K is 14/24ths gold content or 58.5% gold: This is the most common gold karatage in the United States because of its fine balance between gold content, durability and affordability.
  • 10K is 10/24ths gold content or 41.7% gold: This karatage is gaining popularity for its affordability and durability. Commonly used in everyday-wear jewelry such as rings, 10K gold beautifully withstands wear and tear. It is the lowest gold content that can be legally marked or sold as gold jewelry in the United States.

    In order to determine the karat weight of a specific item, simply look for the quality mark. Jewelry items will bear the stamp of their karatage based upon the United States or European system of marking. The United States system designates pieces by their karats—24K, 18K, 14K, 10K, etc. The European system designates pieces by their percentage of gold content. For instance, 10K gold is marked “417,” denoting 41.7% gold; 14K is marked “585,” denoting 58.5% gold; and 18K is marked “750,” denoting 75% gold; etc.

    Gold Karat
    Gold's softness and malleability make it a wonderful metal to work with when creating virtually any design in jewelry. But this softness can be a drawback as well. To make it stronger and more durable, gold is usually alloyed, or mixed, with other metals such as copper or silver. The higher a metal's percentage of gold content, the softer and more yellow the jewelry piece. The karat weight system used to measure gold in a piece is the same for all hues, including white and yellow gold.

    The word “carat” is Arabic, meaning “bean seed.” This is because historically seeds were used to measure weights of gold and precious stones. In the United States, “karat” with a “k” is used to measure gold's purity, while “carat” with a “c” is used in measuring a gemstone's size. The karat mark of gold represents the percentage of pure gold to alloy.

  • 24K is pure gold or 100% gold
  • 21K is 21/24ths gold content or 87.5% gold: In the United States, jewelry with this karatage or higher is rare. It is far more common in Europe, the Middle East and Southeast Asia.
  • 18K is 18/24ths gold content or 75% gold: This karatage is a popular high-end choice in the United States, Europe and other regions. Its popularity is spreading throughout North America.
  • 14K is 14/24ths gold content or 58.5% gold: This is the most common gold karatage in the United States because of its fine balance between gold content, durability and affordability.
  • 10K is 10/24ths gold content or 41.7% gold: This karatage is gaining popularity for its affordability and durability. Commonly used in everyday-wear jewelry such as rings, 10K gold beautifully withstands wear and tear. It is the lowest gold content that can be legally marked or sold as gold jewelry in the United States.

    In order to determine the karat weight of a specific item, simply look for the quality mark. Jewelry items will bear the stamp of their karatage based upon the United States or European system of marking. The United States system designates pieces by their karats—24K, 18K, 14K, 10K, etc. The European system designates pieces by their percentage of gold content. For instance, 10K gold is marked “417,” denoting 41.7% gold; 14K is marked “585,” denoting 58.5% gold; and 18K is marked “750,” denoting 75% gold; etc.

    History of Coin Jewelry
    Wearing coins as jewelry is practically as ancient as the first coins themselves! For centuries, people have been wearing coin jewelry as a way to display their wealth or showcase their passion for the coins they've collected. Ancient Egyptians adorned their soldiers with coin jewelry featuring imperial portraits, while the Roman Empire valued pendants that were emblazoned with coins mounted for easy removal.

    Coin jewelry is divided into two different categories: whole coins versus cut coins. Whole coin jewelry features complete, unaltered coins set into a particular ornament; Cut coin jewelry – which first appeared in the 1600s – features coins that have been altered through carving or engraving. To cut a coin, a craftsman would pierce it with small holes until the main figure was released. In the period from the late 1800s to World War II, coins began to be etched and decorated by hand (in lieu of being cut). Because they were personalized with floral motifs and initials, they became known as "sweetheart jewelry".

    Today, the increasing popularity of coin jewelry is the result of a trend that began centuries ago. So instead of tucking coins away in drawers or boxes, why not proudly display and enjoy them? By mounting coins in jewelry, belt buckles, key chains, or money clips, they will be showcased and honored in a way that conveys a respect for history, an affirmation of heritage, and a reflection of values.

  • About the Collection
    Delight in the rich, bold look of jewelry made in the heart of Tuscany, Italy with Stefano Oro. Exclusive to ShopHQ, these gorgeous and affordable designs come from the small province of Arezzo, Italy - a city rich in maintaining its medieval heritage. Discover this captivating, classically-styled gold collection of renowned designer Stefano Virginio that brings history back to life in a uniquely modern way.

    Stefano VirginioAbout The Guest
    Born in Florence Italy, Stefano Virginio has spent nearly three decades developing his line of Italian jewelry. Still creating in the old world tradition, he continues to innovate jewelry designs to delight and excite. Each masterpiece is individually and meticulously handcrafted using 14K gold, and is designed for affordable, lasting beauty and radiance.

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