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Eschew bland style with the cool blue hues of these entrancing gemstone stud earrings. From the Victoria Wieck Collection, this dazzling duo is full of flash and elegance. Each earring is crafted from sterling silver and features an overall oval shape. A fabulous fluorite gemstone fills in the center of the stud as a ring of radiant white zircon accents circle around it. A subtly teardrop shapes offshoot crowns the top of the stud with a London Blue topaz and more zircons to complete the look.

Earring Details

  • Metal: Rhodium plated sterling silver
  • Stone Information:
  • Fluorite: Two oval cut 10 x 8mm
  • London Blue Topaz: Two pear cut 4 x 3mm
  • White Zircon: Various round modified-brilliant cut 1.5mm, 12 round modified-brilliant cut 1.25mm and six round modified-brilliant cut 1mm
  • Setting Type: Prng
  • Approximate Total Weight:
  • Fluorite: 4.67ct
  • London Blue Topaz: 0.38ct
  • White Zircon: 0.88ct
  • Measurements: 3/4"L x 1/2"W x 1/4"H
  • Backing: Butterfly
  • Collection: Victoria Wieck Collection
  • Country of Origin: India

All weights pertaining to gemstones, including diamonds, are minimum weights. Additionally, please note that many gemstones are treated to enhance their beauty. View Gemstone Enhancements and Special Care Requirements for important information.

SterlingSilver    Studs    Fluorite    

Sterling Silver

Sterling silver, also called fine silver, is a beautifully lustrous cool-toned precious metal favored in fine jewelry among other products. The most reflective of all metals (excluding mercury), sterling silver looks stunning by itself and brings out the best hues in an array of colorful gemstones.

Sterling silver can be polished to a higher sheen than platinum. In fact, Ag, the chemical symbol for silver, comes from a word that means “white and shining.” The surface of silver can boast that shiny, polished appearance, or can be brushed, satin, matte, sandblasted, antiqued or oxidized (chemically blackened).

In order to be called sterling silver, a metal must be made up of a minimum of 92.5% pure silver and 7.5% alloy (meaning other metals), including but not limited to copper and nickel. The alloy is added to pure silver to make the metal more durable, tougher and harder. Sterling silver is designated a fineness of “925.” Pieces with sterling silver may be marked “sterling.”

Finishes on Sterling Silver
Finishing, or plating, is a common treatment with sterling silver. Popular types of plating are rhodium plating, gold plating and anti-tarnish plating. Plating is used to extend the life and sheen of the jewelry. After sizing or buffing a piece of jewelry with a machine, it must be re-plated to restore the finish.

  • Rhodium Plating: Rhodium plating is a complex and laborious process that enhances the luster and beauty and extends the life of silver. A member of the platinum metal group, rhodium is often used as a finishing touch on silver jewelry. It's a shiny silvery metal with a very white and reflective appearance, much like mercury. It's also very hard, so it withstands much wear and tear, resists natural tarnishing and wonderfully mimics the brilliant finish of freshly polished silver.

    Caring for Sterling Silver
    Sterling silver becomes tarnished as the result of a natural chemical process that occurs when sterling silver is exposed to chemicals in the air, rubber, wool and latex. Humidity also plays a role in accelerating tarnishing. It's easy to keep your sterling silver sparkling, though, by taking a few steps to prevent tarnish and other wear and tear.

  • Avoid exposing sterling silver to direct sunlight and harsh chemicals, including chlorine, ammonia, hair products, perfumes, cosmetics, perspiration and strong jewelry cleaning solutions.
  • Periodically wash sterling silver with mild dish soap and warm water. Rinse well and dry completely with a soft cloth before storing because moisture can cause tarnish.
  • Lightly polish sterling silver frequently with a soft silver-polishing cloth, avoiding abrasive cloths completely.
  • Tarnish is easy to remove when it first forms as a yellowish tint, but becomes more difficult to remove when it becomes brown and black. Remove tarnish with a silver polish cream, avoiding immersing pieces with gemstones in tarnish-removal solutions.
  • Minimize scratches on sterling silver by storing it in its own compartment in your jewelry box or in a cloth pouch. Sterling silver may also be stored in sealed polyethylene bags.

    Earring Back Types


    The backing is an important part of an earring, providing a secure closure and comfortable fit. Keep in mind, some earring styles work better with certain back types. Experiment with the different types to find the best fit for you!

    Butterfly Back: A double looped piece resembling a butterfly that fits over a post. Variations on this design are called push back clasps. The basic post and butterfly back are usually used for stud earrings and lighter weight drop earrings.

    Hinged Snap Backs: This clasp features a hinged post that snaps into a groove on the back of the earring. It is commonly found on hoops. Sometimes the hinged post is curved to provide more room to fit around the ear, sometimes called a saddleback.

    Hook Backs: This earring backing is simply a long, bent post that fits through the piercing. Hooks have several variations, most notably the shepherd's hook and the French hook. While thin wire hooks reduce the weight of long earrings, making them more comfortable, they aren't as secure as other clasp styles.

    Lever Back: A hinged lever snaps shut against the curved post to form a closed loop around the ear lobe. This clasp is very secure and good for large or medium sized styles that drop just below the ear.

    Omega: Also called French clips, this clasp has a straight post and a looped lever. The hinged lever closes around the post and is held against the ear with pressure. The omega clasp is the most secure clasp, especially for the larger, heavier earrings.

    Screw back: This backing is a slight variation of the standard post and butterfly nut back. Instead of pushing on the back, the nut twists onto the threaded post. A screw back post design is often preferred for expensive diamond stud earrings that require increased security.

    Fluorite
    Fluorite earns the reputation as the most colorful mineral in the world. A rich purple color is its most famous and popular color, but its range of colors can be extremely variable with hues of blue, green, yellow, colorless, brown, red, pink, black and reddish orange. Intermediate pastels are also possible. Fluorite’s colorless variety is a rare find that makes it highly sought-after by collectors. Its brown variety features a distinctive iridescence and the more rare colors of rose and black are very attractive and in high demand. Most fluorites have a single color, but some have multiple colors that are arranged in bands or zones corresponding to the shapes of their crystals. A single crystal of fluorite could potentially have four or five different colors. Prized for its glassy luster, its crystals range from transparent to translucent.

    Fluorite is strongly fluorescent with extremely variable colors. Typically it fluoresces blue or violet, but other fluorescent colors include yellow, green, red and white. It has a hardness of 4.0 on the Mohs Scale and has been known to fade in the sunlight. The mineral is found throughout the world, including Canada, Mexico, Brazil, Morocco, South Africa, Europe, Mongolia, China and Russia. In the United States, the states in the Mississippi Valley, especially Illinois, Kentucky and Ohio, have historically contained the largest deposits, but Colorado also has ample deposits of fluorite, as well.

    The word fluorite comes from the Latin word meaning “to flow.” For centuries, the ancient Egyptians and Chinese used fluorite in carvings. Carved ornaments were even recovered from the ruins of Pompeii. Fluorite today is believed to be a spiritual stone that excels at calming the spirit and mind. Used as flux in the smelting of metallic ores , fluorite was originally referred to as “fluorspar” by miners and is still called that today.

  • About the Collection
    Victoria Wieck Collection

    Inspire your style with the Victoria Wieck Collection. World-renowned jewelry designer Victoria Wieck brings decades of experience and a unique multicultural perspective to every piece in her brand-new Victoria Wieck Collection. Hand-crafted from the finest materials by expert jewelers, the entire collection is a reflection of Victoria’s passion for creating versatile yet timeless jewelry & watches for the modern woman. The Victoria Wieck Collection delivers elegant, high-quality style at an affordable price.

    Victoria Wieck Collection
    Inspire your style

    guest's nameAbout the Guest
    Victoria Wieck has more than 25 years of experience in the industry, designing high-quality, timeless jewelry inspired by her heritage. Originally born in South Korea, she moved with her family to the United States when she was 12 and was deeply inspired by the beauty found in everything around her. Now an established jewelry icon, Victoria has become known for her elegant, glamorous and imaginative designs with every piece telling a story.