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"Mama's Family" Seasons One & Two Complete Episodes w/ Bonus Features & Memory Booklet - 000-803


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000-803 - ''Mama's Family'' Seasons One & Two Complete Episodes w/ Bonus Features & Memory Booklet
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"Mama's Family" Seasons One & Two Complete Episodes w/ Bonus Features & Memory Booklet

Take a trip down memory lane with Mama! Featuring over 17 hours of full uncut episodes from seasons one and two, this “Mama's Family” DVD offer brings the laughter of one of the most popular and beloved sitcoms in TV history. As portrayed by Vicki Lawrence, the formidable Mama put the "diss" in dysfunctional. Mama dispensed no-nonsense motherly advice, discipline, and verbal kicks in the backside. There's her nervous sister Fran (Rue McClanahan), slow-witted son Vint (Ken Berry), his bubble-headed girlfriend (and later wife) Naomi (Dorothy Lyman). Plus frequent appearances by Betty White as Mama's snobbish daughter, Ellen, and Carol Burnett as Mama's uptight daughter (and anger-management-class failure) Eunice.

As you may guess, this isn't the Brady Bunch! Complete seasons include bonus material of "Mama's Family" cast reunion and interviews featuring Vicki Lawrence, Betty White and Ken Berry. The offer also includes a Collectible "Mama's Family" Album booklet with rare photos, quotes from the stars and more!

You will receive
  • Season 1 with 13 episodes on Three Discs
  • Season 2 with 22 episodes on Four Discs
  • One Bonus Features Disc
  • Collectible Mama's Family Album Booklet

About "Mama’s Family"
In the world of prime-time television, success often begets success by way of the spin-off. The Carol Burnett Show lasted 11 seasons on CBS, thanks in part to the recurring comedy sketches that attracted a large, loyal viewership. "The Family" remained a favorite because fans related to the Harpers' constant squabbling about mundane stuff. As the irascible Mama Harper, Vicki Lawrence was wondrously transformed into a full-tilt senior citizen, and it wasn't a matter of if, but when she would get her own TV series.

Season One
The hapless Harpers give new meaning to the term "nuclear family" in season one. Nothing is easy after son Vint (Ken Berry) and his brood move in. The Kwik-Keys locksmith marries Mama's next-door "floozy" neighbor Naomi (Dorothy Lyman), which brings out the worse of the Harper clan at the home ceremony. All hell breaks loose when a bee-blasted Eunice (Carol Burnett) sings "Oh Promise me." She turns a surprise birthday party into a disorderly conduct charge, and gets thrown in jail with Thelma. where they share some quality mother-daughter time alongside a savvy hooker. Mama reluctantly steps out from behind her apron and heads to Hollywood with daughter Ellen (Betty White) and Vint's crew to appear on Family Feud.

Season Two
The second season of "Mama's Family" finds the Harper matriarch meddling and peddling her homespun wisdom to anyone within earshot. She ghosts as an advice columnist for her sister, Fran (Rue McClanahan), and helps spring cousin Gert (Imogene Coca) from a retirement community after livening up a birthday party there. Mama takers her lumps, especially when she's clocked by a pit while making gooseberry jam with daughters Eunice and Ellen, or dealing with dimwitted son Vint. But you can't keep the old lady down for long.

Collectible Mama's Family Album
This collectible booklet features character bios, a Mama's Family Tree, and anecdotes from cast members with quotes from Vicki Lawrence, Ken Berry, Dorothy Lyman and more! This is a wonderful collectible for any Mama's Family Show Fan!

Made in the USA

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    Glossary:

  • Aspect ratio: The width and height of the screen or signal. Widescreen is considered 16:9; most traditional televisions are 4:3.
  • CD-R: A compact disc that allows music or data to be recorded once. Most DVD players will play back CDs in this format.
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  • Progressive scan: An image that is processed in one pass at a rate of 60x per second. This provides a much sharper image than an older technology called interlaced video . Both your DVD player and your television/monitor must be progressive scan-capable in order to utilize this function. If you do not have a device that supports progressive scan (HDTV, CRT, LCD, etc.), it will not work. If you have a digital television (or are planning on getting one), you may want to consider purchasing a progressive scan DVD player. Progressive scan can also supply interlaced video, so it will work with a traditional television as well.
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  • RF modulator: Allows you to connect your DVD player to a television that does not have audio/video jacks in back. It connects through a coaxial cable connection.
  • VCD: Video CD. A primitive digital movie format. Some DVD players will play back CDs in this format.




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