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Toshiba Upconversion DVD & VHS Player/Recorder - 432-643


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432-643 - Toshiba Upconversion DVD & VHS Player/Recorder
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Toshiba Upconversion DVD & VHS Player/Recorder

Get the best of VCR and DVD recording and playback without the clutter! From Toshiba, the versatile DVR620 Upconversion DVD and VHS Player/Recorder takes the fuss out of saving your videotapes to DVD and enhances DVD picture quality to near HD with 1080p upconversion via the HDMI port.

You will receive
  • Toshiba DVR620KU Upconversion DVD & VHS Player/Recorder
  • Remote Control with Two AA Batteries
  • RCA Audio/Video Cable
  • Owner's Manual
  • Quick Setup Guide
  • Return Stop Sheet
  • Warranty Sheet

Multi-format Recording and Playback
Multi-format recording and playback provides the utmost in recording media convenience with compatibility with the most popular formats including DVD-R, DVD-RW, DVD+R, DVD+RW.

1080p Video Upconversion
Video upconversion up to 1080p resolution via HDMI takes your current DVDs to a new level, for an amazing viewing experience on today's HDTVs. HDMI cable sold separately.

One Touch Recording
One Touch Recording makes recording your favorite show simple. Just connect the DVR620 to your cable or satellite box and you are set to record with the push of one button.

Auto Finalize with Undo
Auto Finalize with Undo simplifies the recording process by automatically finalizing your recording for playback on standard DVD players.

Bi-directional Dubbing
Bi-directional dubbing lets you copy from tape to disc, or vice versa, with the push of one button.

Dimensions: 17-1/8"L x 10-1/2"W x 3-15/16"H
Weight: 9.46 lbs
Made in China.

Warranty: 90 day limited warranty
Warranty Support: 1-888-592-0944

Blu-ray, DVD & Video    


Comparing DVD Players:
Comparing the various DVD player models that exist and deciding which to buy is simpler than it may seem. If you’re mainly interested in something that will hook directly to your TV and play movies, you’ll find good quality models for less than $100. Even the most basic DVD player will give you an excellent movie-watching experience. For those who are looking to get a little more out of their DVD player, there are plenty of choices out there.

  • If you have a home theater system, you’ll want to consider a DVD player that has Dolby 5.1 audio capabilities. This will truly bring your movies to life with rich, high-quality sound like you experience in theaters.
  • If you’re planning to use your DVD player to play audio CDs, there are models that will allow you to load multiple discs at once for longer continuous play. Some, but not all, DVD players also support CD-RW and MP3 playback.
  • If you have a high-end digital television with component video, you may want to consider a DVD player with progressive scan, which will give you an even sharper image quality than you can normally get with a regular TV and DVD setup.

    Hooking up your DVD player:
    There are several ways to hook up a DVD player to your television, and your options will depend upon both the type of signal your DVD player outputs and the type of signal your TV can input. Different DVD players have different output options, so it’s important to read the details about a particular model before you make your purchase.

  • Most newer televisions support composite video that uses a combination of yellow, red and white cables to connect to a DVD player, VCR or stereo receiver. If your DVD player is going to be one of several components in a home theater system, you may need to purchase additional cords to get everything hooked together.
  • Another method of connecting your DVD player is with a cable called S-video, which connects from your television to the player via a single cable.
  • If you have a digital television, you can connect your DVD player to it with special component video cords.
  • If you want to connect your DVD player to your television through the antenna/cable input jack, you will need to purchase an RF modulator to get it to work.

    Caring for your DVD player:

  • Caring for your DVD player is pretty straightforward. It is an enclosed unit, so it should not require much in the way of cleaning or maintenance. If you keep your DVDs clean, then your player should stay clean.
  • Keep your DVDs clean by always handling them by the edges. Keep them in their cases when not in use. If you need to clean the surface of a DVD, wipe it with a cotton fabric, always in a straight line from the center hole to the edge. A DVD should not be exposed to extreme temperatures, sunlight or high humidity.
  • Never attempt to use a cracked or broken DVD in your player; it can cause damage to the lens. Lens-cleaning kits made specifically for DVD players can help keep the lens clean and your player operating properly.

    Glossary:

  • Aspect ratio: The width and height of the screen or signal. Widescreen is considered 16:9; most traditional televisions are 4:3.
  • CD-R: A compact disc that allows music or data to be recorded once. Most DVD players will play back CDs in this format.
  • CD-RW: A compact disc that allows music or data to be recorded many times. Some DVD players cannot play this kind of format, so be sure to check the details about a specific DVD player model if you want to be able to play CD-RWs.
  • D/A converter: Converts digital signals to analog (audio and/or video).
  • Digital outputs:
    Component video: Provides you with the highest-quality video image. Not all televisions support component video. It uses three RCA-style jacks.
    S-video: This is the second-highest image quality available. A cable connects from your DVD player to your television (both must have S-video jacks).
    Composite video: The most basic of all connections between your DVD player and your television. It uses a single RCA-style cable. This type of connection will give you the lowest-quality image.
  • Dolby Digital: Many DVD players feature Dolby Digital output, which provides you with a dynamic sound experience if you have a home theater set up in your home. Even if you don’t currently have a home theater but may assemble one in the future, this is definitely something to consider when purchasing a DVD player. The most common speaker setup is Dolby 5.1, where there is one in the center, one at front left, one at front right, one rear left and one rear right (the “5”) with one subwoofer (the “.1”).
  • Frequency response: Typical frequency response for audio equipment is from 20Hz to 20,000Hz (or 20kHz). Any frequency outside this range is typically inaudible to humans.
  • HDTV: High Definition Television. It features higher resolution and aspect ratio than what a traditional television is capable of.
  • Interlaced video: The traditional way to display an image on a screen by drawing the odd lines first, then the even lines at a refresh rate of 30x per second. A newer technology called progressive scan provides a sharper image than interlaced video, but not all video equipment supports progressive scan. If you have a digital television (or are planning on getting one), you may want to consider purchasing a progressive scan DVD player over the interlaced model. Progressive scan can also supply interlaced video, so it will work with a traditional television as well.
  • LCD (Liquid Crystal Display): Liquid Crystal Display. A flat display that does not utilize a traditional tube to project an image.
  • Letterbox: A “letterbox” refers to the black “bars” that appear at the top and bottom of the screen. Used to keep the integrity of the wider theatrical aspect ratio.
  • Progressive scan: An image that is processed in one pass at a rate of 60x per second. This provides a much sharper image than an older technology called interlaced video . Both your DVD player and your television/monitor must be progressive scan-capable in order to utilize this function. If you do not have a device that supports progressive scan (HDTV, CRT, LCD, etc.), it will not work. If you have a digital television (or are planning on getting one), you may want to consider purchasing a progressive scan DVD player. Progressive scan can also supply interlaced video, so it will work with a traditional television as well.
  • Refresh rate: The rate at which the image on the screen is completely replaced with a new image. This is measured in Frames Per Second (FPS).
  • RF modulator: Allows you to connect your DVD player to a television that does not have audio/video jacks in back. It connects through a coaxial cable connection.
  • VCD: Video CD. A primitive digital movie format. Some DVD players will play back CDs in this format.




  • Specifications

    Ports
    • One RCA Video/ Audio Input
    • One DV Input (Front)
    • One S-Video Input
    • One HDMI Output
    • One Component Video Output
    • One S-Video Output
    • Two RCA Video/ Audio Outputs (One Front, One Rear)
    • OneCoaxial Output

    Playback Formats: DVD-R, CD-RW, DVD+RW, DVD-Video, CD-R, DVD+R, CD-DA, VCD, SVCD, DVD-RW
      Clear all