| Order Status | My Account | Email Sign-up | Help | Cart
CID=VMWEBP8

Gem Treasures 14K Gold 1.36ctw Spessartite & Diamond Halo Cut-out Ring - 133-943


Retail Value: $1,428.00
ShopHQ Price: $1,175.00
Clearance Price: $698.13
  Save: $476.87 (41% off)
or  6 ValuePay:  $116.36
Shipping & Handling: $10.99
Select Size:
Select Quantity:


Disabled Add to Cart
Notify MeNotify me if back in stock

133-943 - Gem Treasures 14K Gold 1.36ctw Spessartite & Diamond Halo Cut-out Ring
Loading the player...
IMPORTANT: Video replays of previously aired programs may contain special offers, promotions or pricing that are no longer valid. Please see current pricing opitons displayed next to the video.
 
Gem Treasures 14K Gold 1.36ctw Spessartite & Diamond Halo Cut-out Ring

Crafted from 14K yellow gold, this ring showcases one oval full cut 7x5mm orange spessartite double haloed by various round and baguette full cut 1-2mm white diamonds - all in prong settings. Scrollwork on the shank adds an ornate touch to this elegant ring.

The spessartite weighs 1.09ct and the total diamond weight is 0.27ct (both approximate). The diamond clarity weight is I1-I2 and the color grade is I-J. The ring measures 9/16"L x 13/16"W x 3/8"H.

Please note: Gemstone may vary in color and/or pattern. Please allow for these natural variations.

Click here to find your ring size.

Part of the Gem Treasures Collection. Made in China. All weights pertaining to diamond weights are minimum weights. Additionally, please note that many gemstones are treated to enhance their beauty. Click here for important information about gemstone enhancements and special care requirements.


Spessartite    


Spessartite:

Spessartite garnet can be red or blackish brown, but is most commonly available in rich golds, fiery oranges and warmer browns. Originally named after its occurrence in the German Spessart Mountains, there was a surprising discovery of the bright orange-red stone in Nigeria and Namibia. Until then, spessartites had existed as mere collector’s items or rarities and were hardly ever used for jewelry because they were so rare. But the new location discovery changed the world of jewelry gemstones and spessartites made their way into jewelry fashion.

The most popular type of spessartite is the mandarin garnet, a gem that features a bright orange hue that ranges from that of ripe peaches to the deepest of red-orange sunsets. Signifying energy and joy of life, this stone represents the spirit of individuality and the vibrancy of life. The mandarin garnet has a remarkably high refraction of light, creating an exceptional brilliance that vividly sparkles even in unfavorable light. To bring out the best of the gem’s unique color and brilliance, most are faceted cut to allow for this tremendous sparkle of fire.

The fascinating orange color featured in mandarin garnets plays an important role in Asian arts. Yellow and red, the two colors constituting orange, are not considered opposites in Asia, but rather complements to each other. The color symbolizes the continual change of life throughout the ages. Asian gods and Buddhist monks are often dressed in orange robes and the sky in Asian art is often painted orange.

Mandarin garnets were first found along the Kunene River in Namibia in 1991, embedded in the mica slate where they had been formed millions of years ago. Gemologists discovered the orange-colored stones were in fact variations of the rare spessartite gems and members of the garnet family. At that time, spessartites were fairly rare stones, even for collectors, and had hardly been used for jewelry. Some gemologists called the brilliant orange gemstones "kunene spessartine” according to their occurrence. But quite soon the term “mandarin garnet” spread throughout the international market and the stone made its successful appearance around the world. Popularity increased dramatically and the mine on the Kunene River was soon exploited. Fortunately, in April of 1994, mandarin garnets were discovered in Nigeria. The stones are now available once again in reliable amounts, though top-quality stones are rare and it is difficult to predict how long quantity will remain reliable.




  Clear all