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GPX® 9" LCD Portable DVD Player w/ Carrying Case, Earbuds & Car Charger - 433-134


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433-134 - GPX® 9'' LCD Portable DVD Player w/ Carrying Case, Earbuds & Car Charger
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GPX® 9" LCD Portable DVD Player w/ Carrying Case, Earbuds & Car Charger

A portable cinema with on-the-go power! The GPX® 9" Portable DVD Player lets you take the best in home entertainment on the road. Perfect for travel and gift giving, this bundle includes a carrying case, set of two ear buds, remote control and car charger so you're prepared for any adventure.

Features
  • Watch movies anywhere with the built-in rechargeable battery
  • 9" LCD screen swivels and folds down transforming this DVD player into a compact tablet
  • Plug in a thumb drive or SD card to listen to music and view photos
  • Two sets of ear buds allow you to watch movies without distracting others
  • Plug in at home or in the car with the included AC and DC adapters

You will receive
  • GPX® 9" LCD Portable DVD Player in your choice of Blue, Green, Red or Silver
  • Remote Control with Batteries
  • Black Carrying Case
  • 3.5mm to RCA Audio/Video Cable
  • Headphone Splitter
  • Set of Two Stereo Earbuds
  • AC/DC Power Adapter
  • 12 volt DC Car Adapter
  • Warranty
  • User's Guide

Dimensions: 7-1/8"H x 9-5/8"W x 1-11/16"D
Weight: 2 lbs
Made in China

Warranty: 90 day limited warranty
Warranty Support: 1-888-999-4215

To learn more about this bundle, please view the additional information tab above.

Blu-rayDVDVideo    29Under    TVDVDCombos    LCD    


Comparing DVD Players:
Comparing the various DVD player models that exist and deciding which to buy is simpler than it may seem. If you’re mainly interested in something that will hook directly to your TV and play movies, you’ll find good quality models for less than $100. Even the most basic DVD player will give you an excellent movie-watching experience. For those who are looking to get a little more out of their DVD player, there are plenty of choices out there.

  • If you have a home theater system, you’ll want to consider a DVD player that has Dolby 5.1 audio capabilities. This will truly bring your movies to life with rich, high-quality sound like you experience in theaters.
  • If you’re planning to use your DVD player to play audio CDs, there are models that will allow you to load multiple discs at once for longer continuous play. Some, but not all, DVD players also support CD-RW and MP3 playback.
  • If you have a high-end digital television with component video, you may want to consider a DVD player with progressive scan, which will give you an even sharper image quality than you can normally get with a regular TV and DVD setup.

    Hooking up your DVD player:
    There are several ways to hook up a DVD player to your television, and your options will depend upon both the type of signal your DVD player outputs and the type of signal your TV can input. Different DVD players have different output options, so it’s important to read the details about a particular model before you make your purchase.

  • Most newer televisions support composite video that uses a combination of yellow, red and white cables to connect to a DVD player, VCR or stereo receiver. If your DVD player is going to be one of several components in a home theater system, you may need to purchase additional cords to get everything hooked together.
  • Another method of connecting your DVD player is with a cable called S-video, which connects from your television to the player via a single cable.
  • If you have a digital television, you can connect your DVD player to it with special component video cords.
  • If you want to connect your DVD player to your television through the antenna/cable input jack, you will need to purchase an RF modulator to get it to work.

    Caring for your DVD player:

  • Caring for your DVD player is pretty straightforward. It is an enclosed unit, so it should not require much in the way of cleaning or maintenance. If you keep your DVDs clean, then your player should stay clean.
  • Keep your DVDs clean by always handling them by the edges. Keep them in their cases when not in use. If you need to clean the surface of a DVD, wipe it with a cotton fabric, always in a straight line from the center hole to the edge. A DVD should not be exposed to extreme temperatures, sunlight or high humidity.
  • Never attempt to use a cracked or broken DVD in your player; it can cause damage to the lens. Lens-cleaning kits made specifically for DVD players can help keep the lens clean and your player operating properly.

    Glossary:

  • Aspect ratio: The width and height of the screen or signal. Widescreen is considered 16:9; most traditional televisions are 4:3.
  • CD-R: A compact disc that allows music or data to be recorded once. Most DVD players will play back CDs in this format.
  • CD-RW: A compact disc that allows music or data to be recorded many times. Some DVD players cannot play this kind of format, so be sure to check the details about a specific DVD player model if you want to be able to play CD-RWs.
  • D/A converter: Converts digital signals to analog (audio and/or video).
  • Digital outputs:
    Component video: Provides you with the highest-quality video image. Not all televisions support component video. It uses three RCA-style jacks.
    S-video: This is the second-highest image quality available. A cable connects from your DVD player to your television (both must have S-video jacks).
    Composite video: The most basic of all connections between your DVD player and your television. It uses a single RCA-style cable. This type of connection will give you the lowest-quality image.
  • Dolby Digital: Many DVD players feature Dolby Digital output, which provides you with a dynamic sound experience if you have a home theater set up in your home. Even if you don’t currently have a home theater but may assemble one in the future, this is definitely something to consider when purchasing a DVD player. The most common speaker setup is Dolby 5.1, where there is one in the center, one at front left, one at front right, one rear left and one rear right (the “5”) with one subwoofer (the “.1”).
  • Frequency response: Typical frequency response for audio equipment is from 20Hz to 20,000Hz (or 20kHz). Any frequency outside this range is typically inaudible to humans.
  • HDTV: High Definition Television. It features higher resolution and aspect ratio than what a traditional television is capable of.
  • Interlaced video: The traditional way to display an image on a screen by drawing the odd lines first, then the even lines at a refresh rate of 30x per second. A newer technology called progressive scan provides a sharper image than interlaced video, but not all video equipment supports progressive scan. If you have a digital television (or are planning on getting one), you may want to consider purchasing a progressive scan DVD player over the interlaced model. Progressive scan can also supply interlaced video, so it will work with a traditional television as well.
  • LCD (Liquid Crystal Display): Liquid Crystal Display. A flat display that does not utilize a traditional tube to project an image.
  • Letterbox: A “letterbox” refers to the black “bars” that appear at the top and bottom of the screen. Used to keep the integrity of the wider theatrical aspect ratio.
  • Progressive scan: An image that is processed in one pass at a rate of 60x per second. This provides a much sharper image than an older technology called interlaced video . Both your DVD player and your television/monitor must be progressive scan-capable in order to utilize this function. If you do not have a device that supports progressive scan (HDTV, CRT, LCD, etc.), it will not work. If you have a digital television (or are planning on getting one), you may want to consider purchasing a progressive scan DVD player. Progressive scan can also supply interlaced video, so it will work with a traditional television as well.
  • Refresh rate: The rate at which the image on the screen is completely replaced with a new image. This is measured in Frames Per Second (FPS).
  • RF modulator: Allows you to connect your DVD player to a television that does not have audio/video jacks in back. It connects through a coaxial cable connection.
  • VCD: Video CD. A primitive digital movie format. Some DVD players will play back CDs in this format.



    Q. What different types of HDTVs are available and how do they compare to one another?
    A. Rear Projection DLP, and Flat Panel LCD, Plasma and LED have their pros and cons.

    Rear Projection (DLP)

  • Good to excellent picture quality
  • Sizes from 40" to 73"
  • Generally less expensive than flat panel TVs
  • Bigger, heavier, bulkier than LCD and plasma models
  • Flat Panel LCD

  • Excellent picture quality
  • Available in small screen sizes (under 32")
  • Can double as computer monitor
  • Thin, lightweight
  • Generally less expensive than plasma
  • Relatively narrow viewing angle
  • Pixel response can be slow, causing blurred motion, particularly when using the screen for video gaming or other high-demand activities
  • Flat Panel Plasma

  • Superior picture quality to LCD, though it is debatable
  • Screen sizes up to 70" or more
  • Thin, lightweight
  • Wide viewing angle; looks good from almost any angle
  • Faster pixel response; better for gaming and fast action sports
  • Generally more expensive than LCD
  • Slight risk of "burn-in", in which a static image becomes "burned" into the screen permanently
  • Q. What type of TVs use a lamp?
    A. Rear Projection DLP TVs use a lamp, with the typical lamp life ranging from 5,000 to 8,000 hours. With normal use, that translates to many years of TV viewing. You may never need to replace your DLP TV lamp (depending on how long you own the TV), but if you do, the typical replacement lamp costs around $200.

    Q. What is screen resolution?
    A. Resolution refers to the number of pixels being used to project an image. In general, the larger the numbers the better the resolution and the picture quality. Current HD programming tops out at 1920 x 1080 pixels. In fact, HD is generally about six times sharper than standard TV, and can be as much as ten times greater.

    Q. What's the difference between 720p, 1080p, and 1080i?
    A. 720 and 1080 refer to horizontal pixel counts. Both 1080p and 1080i HD broadcasts offer higher resolution than 720p broadcasts. The "i" indicates that the TV draws images using an interlaced method. The "p" indicates that the TV draws images using a progressive scan method. In general, progressive scan renders images faster and produces a more detailed, more film-like image. This means 1080p offers the highest quality currently available.

    Q. What do the "i" and "p" mean?
    A. The letters "p" and "i" indicate the picture-scanning method - progressive or interlaced. In interlaced scanning, the on-screen image is created in two split-second passes, drawing all the odd-numbered lines first then going back to fill in all the even-numbered lines. In contrast, progressive scanning draws each frame sequentially in a single pass to create a smoother, cleaner picture. So, progressive scanning is theoretically better than interlaced scanning.

    Q. What do I need to watch HD broadcasts?
    A. Your choices for watching HDTV are via over-the-air broadcasts, cable or digital satellite.

    Over-the-Air Broadcasts

  • HD-compatible TV
  • HDTV (ATSC / digital) tuner - separate unit or built into TV
  • Indoor or outdoor UHF or UHF/VHF antenna
  • Local HDTV broadcasts (free)
  • Cable HDTV

  • HD-compatible TV
  • HD-compatible cable box (or TV with built-in digital cable tuner: QAM or CableCARD-ready)
  • HD programming (subscription required)
  • Digital Satellite HDTV

  • HD-compatible TV
  • HD-compatible satellite receiver
  • HD-compatible satellite dish
  • HD programming (subscription required)
  • Q. What's the difference between a "3D-ready" and a "3D-capable" TV?
    A. 3D-ready TVs come with the necessary emitter built-in; 3D-capable TVs do not, so you'll need to add on a separate one for 3D-capable TVs.

    Q. What do I need to watch 3DTV at home?
    A. You'll need a TV labeled "3D-ready" or "3D-capable", a pair of 3D glasses for each person watching, and a 3D video source such as a 3D Blu-ray movie.


    Q. What different types of HDTVs are available and how do they compare to one another?
    A. Rear Projection DLP, and Flat Panel LCD, Plasma and LED have their pros and cons.

    Rear Projection (DLP)

  • Good to excellent picture quality
  • Sizes from 40" to 73"
  • Generally less expensive than flat panel TVs
  • Bigger, heavier, bulkier than LCD and plasma models
  • Flat Panel LCD

  • Excellent picture quality
  • Available in small screen sizes (under 32")
  • Can double as computer monitor
  • Thin, lightweight
  • Generally less expensive than plasma
  • Relatively narrow viewing angle
  • Pixel response can be slow, causing blurred motion, particularly when using the screen for video gaming or other high-demand activities
  • Flat Panel Plasma

  • Superior picture quality to LCD, though it is debatable
  • Screen sizes up to 70" or more
  • Thin, lightweight
  • Wide viewing angle; looks good from almost any angle
  • Faster pixel response; better for gaming and fast action sports
  • Generally more expensive than LCD
  • Slight risk of "burn-in", in which a static image becomes "burned" into the screen permanently
  • Q. What type of TVs use a lamp?
    A. Rear Projection DLP TVs use a lamp, with the typical lamp life ranging from 5,000 to 8,000 hours. With normal use, that translates to many years of TV viewing. You may never need to replace your DLP TV lamp (depending on how long you own the TV), but if you do, the typical replacement lamp costs around $200.

    Q. What is screen resolution?
    A. Resolution refers to the number of pixels being used to project an image. In general, the larger the numbers the better the resolution and the picture quality. Current HD programming tops out at 1920 x 1080 pixels. In fact, HD is generally about six times sharper than standard TV, and can be as much as ten times greater.

    Q. What's the difference between 720p, 1080p, and 1080i?
    A. 720 and 1080 refer to horizontal pixel counts. Both 1080p and 1080i HD broadcasts offer higher resolution than 720p broadcasts. The "i" indicates that the TV draws images using an interlaced method. The "p" indicates that the TV draws images using a progressive scan method. In general, progressive scan renders images faster and produces a more detailed, more film-like image. This means 1080p offers the highest quality currently available.

    Q. What do the "i" and "p" mean?
    A. The letters "p" and "i" indicate the picture-scanning method - progressive or interlaced. In interlaced scanning, the on-screen image is created in two split-second passes, drawing all the odd-numbered lines first then going back to fill in all the even-numbered lines. In contrast, progressive scanning draws each frame sequentially in a single pass to create a smoother, cleaner picture. So, progressive scanning is theoretically better than interlaced scanning.

    Q. What do I need to watch HD broadcasts?
    A. Your choices for watching HDTV are via over-the-air broadcasts, cable or digital satellite.

    Over-the-Air Broadcasts

  • HD-compatible TV
  • HDTV (ATSC / digital) tuner - separate unit or built into TV
  • Indoor or outdoor UHF or UHF/VHF antenna
  • Local HDTV broadcasts (free)
  • Cable HDTV

  • HD-compatible TV
  • HD-compatible cable box (or TV with built-in digital cable tuner: QAM or CableCARD-ready)
  • HD programming (subscription required)
  • Digital Satellite HDTV

  • HD-compatible TV
  • HD-compatible satellite receiver
  • HD-compatible satellite dish
  • HD programming (subscription required)
  • Q. What's the difference between a "3D-ready" and a "3D-capable" TV?
    A. 3D-ready TVs come with the necessary emitter built-in; 3D-capable TVs do not, so you'll need to add on a separate one for 3D-capable TVs.

    Q. What do I need to watch 3DTV at home?
    A. You'll need a TV labeled "3D-ready" or "3D-capable", a pair of 3D glasses for each person watching, and a 3D video source such as a 3D Blu-ray movie.




    Screen Display Type: TFT LCD Display
    Screen Size: 9"
    Resolution: 640 x 234 native resolution
    Aspect Ratio: 16:9
    NTSC video system
    Multi-Language On-Screen Display
    Dual Voltage 220V/50Hz & 120V/60Hz
    Built-In Speakers

    Battery: DC built-in Lithium polymer
    Battery Life: Approximately two hours

    Input Types: USB Port
    Input Types: SD/MMC/MS
    Input Types: Headphone Jack
    Output Types: 3.5mm Audio/Video
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